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NCAA charges Tennessee with 18 major violations under Jeremy Pruitt

The violations involve allegations of providing impermissible cash, gifts and benefits worth about $60,000 to football recruits and their families.
The NCAA on Friday charged Tennessee with 18 recruiting violations involving allegations of illegal cash, gifts and benefits given under fired football coach Jeremy Pruitt.
The NCAA on Friday charged Tennessee with 18 recruiting violations involving allegations of illegal cash, gifts and benefits given under fired football coach Jeremy Pruitt. [ JOHN BAZEMORE | AP ]
Published Jul. 22

The NCAA on Friday charged Tennessee with 18 major rules violations involving allegations of providing impermissible cash, gifts and benefits worth about $60,000 to football recruits and their families under former coach Jeremy Pruitt.

The school has until Oct. 20 to respond to the Level I violations, the most serious by NCAA standards, according to the letter it received from the association’s enforcement staff.

The NCAA notice of allegations says at least a dozen members of Pruitt’s staff were involved in more than 200 individual violations over a two-year period.

Pruitt and nine others were fired for cause in January 2021 after Tennessee started an internal investigation following a tip on Nov. 13, 2020, and found what the university chancellor called “serious violations of NCAA rules.” The firing negated Pruitt’s $12.6 million buyout after he went 16-19 in three seasons.

Chancellor Donde Plowman had said Pruitt was responsible for overseeing the football program. Tennessee also fired two assistants and seven members of the recruiting and support staff. Pruitt, three of his assistants and three other staffers could face show-cause penalties, which could make it difficult for them to get another college job, after a hearing is held with the NCAA’s Division I Committee on Infractions.

“In every step of this process, we took quick and decisive actions that exemplified the longstanding values of the NCAA reiterated in the membership’s new constitution,” Plowman said in a statement Friday. “The university hired outside counsel to fully investigate allegations about the football program, acted promptly to terminate the employment of football coaches and staff members, and shared our conclusions with the NCAA enforcement staff.

NCAA investigators opened a case in December and became involved within the two weeks before Pruitt was fired. Plowman noted the NCAA enforcement staff recognized the university’s “exemplary cooperation” in the case.

“While we will take appropriate responsibility, last fall, the university announced that we will not self-impose penalties that harm innocent student-athletes like postseason bans based upon the actions of coaches and staff who are no longer part of the institution,” Plowman said.

Three Level I allegations involve impermissible visits during the COVID-19 recruiting dead period.

On nine separate weekends from July to November 2020, about $12,100 in impermissible recruiting inducements and unofficial visit expenses were provided for six recruits and their families to come to the Knoxville area, according to the complaint.

Among the allegations, on at least 31 occasions from January 2019-March 2021, outside linebackers coach Shelton Felton, inside linebackers coach Brian Niedermeyer, recruiting staff member Bethany Gunn and Pruitt’s wife, Casey Pruitt, provided about $16,300 in impermissible benefits to an individual in the form of cash, parking to attend home football games and entertainment expenses to host a recruit’s mother.

And on 25 occasions from January 2019-March 2021, Casey Pruitt allegedly provided a total of $12,500 in cash benefits to an individual for monthly car payments.

Pruitt and two recruiting staffers provided or arranged for approximately $11,223 on at least 20 occasions between January 2019-December 2020. That includes $2,443 reimbursed to the assistant director of recruiting using CashApp for costs that covered furniture, household goods or party decorations.

The then-head coach also provided approximately $6,000 in cash toward a down payment toward a new car during an unofficial visit.

Tennessee athletic director Danny White said in a statement that receiving the notice of allegations “was an expected, requisite step in this process — a process our university initiated proactively through decisive and transparent actions. This moves us one step closer to a final resolution.

“Until we get to that point, I am unable to discuss the case in any detail. As a university, we understand the need to take responsibility for what occurred, but we remain committed to protecting our current and future student-athletes.”

TERESA M. WALKER AP Sports Writer

AP Sports Writer John Raby contributed.

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