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Jeff and Penny Vinik put divorce proceedings on hold

One of Tampa Bay's leading philanthropic couples takes time to work on reconciling.
Jeff and Penny Vinik, pictured in the hallway of their home in the Palma Ceia neighborhood of Tampa. The couple is making an effort to reconcile after Penny filed for divorce.
Jeff and Penny Vinik, pictured in the hallway of their home in the Palma Ceia neighborhood of Tampa. The couple is making an effort to reconcile after Penny filed for divorce. [ DIRK SHADD | Times (2017) ]
Published Jun. 30, 2020

Penny and Jeff Vinik, a Tampa Bay power couple, have put their divorce proceedings on hold for now, filing for a 90-day pause.

“Penny and Jeff have filed an abatement to the divorce proceedings as they work on reconciling their marriage,” Bill Wickett, a spokesman for Jeff Vinik, told the Tampa Bay Times in an email.

Related: Penny Vinik seeks divorce from Lightning owner Jeff Vinik

Jeffrey Fisher, the divorce attorney representing Penny Vinik, did not respond to a request for comment.

Penny Vinik, 57, filed a petition June 8 in Hillsborough Circuit Court to dissolve her marriage with Jeff Vinik, 61. That filing referred to the marriage as irretrievably broken. If she has not withdrawn the petition by Sept. 24, the divorce litigation will resume.

Jeff Vinik owns the Tampa Bay Lightning and is the leading developer behind the Water Street Tampa project. He is also a member of FBN Partners, a group of local investors who have loaned $15 million to Times Publishing Co., which owns the Tampa Bay Times.

Penny Vinik has been a strong advocate for and patron of the arts within Tampa Bay. Together, they have been one of the area’s leading philanthropic families.

They pledged $20 million to the community since Jeff bought the Lightning in 2010 and have surpassed that amount through the team’s Community Hero program alone.

In the three month since the outbreak of COVID-19, the couple has donated nearly $2 million in relief efforts, including $1 million to Metropolitan Ministries for food and rent assistance.