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Dodgers' Andrew Friedman named MLB Executive of the Year

The Rays' Erik Neander, who won the award last season, finished third.
President of Baseball Operations Andrew Friedman celebrates with the trophy after the Dodgers beat the Braves in the National League Championship Series in October in Arlington, Texas.
President of Baseball Operations Andrew Friedman celebrates with the trophy after the Dodgers beat the Braves in the National League Championship Series in October in Arlington, Texas. [ TONY GUTIERREZ | Associated Press ]
Published Nov. 17, 2020
Updated Nov. 17, 2020

Los Angeles Dodgers President of Baseball Operations Andrew Friedman, whose club put together baseball’s best regular-season record before beating the Rays in the World Series, won Major League Baseball’s Executive of the Year Award, the league announced today.

Rick Hahn of the Chicago White Sox was the runnerup. The Rays' Erik Neander, who won the award last season, finished third.

The award was voted on by the 30 major-league clubs prior to the start of the postseason.

Related: Andrew Friedman faces ‘monster he created’ in Rays

The Dodgers finished the regular season with an MLB-best 43-17 record en route to their eighth straight National League West title. Only the Atlanta Braves (14, 1991-2005) and New York Yankees (9, 1998-2006) have won more consecutive division titles.

Incredibly, the Dodgers lost just one series all year — at home vs. Colorado from September 4th-6th — and finished the season with a 15-1-4 series record, including six sweeps.

Friedman, the former Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations and General Manager of the Rays, then watched the Dodgers go on to beat the team he once helped build from baseball’s worst to one of its best in the World Series. The six-game victory gave Los Angeles its first title since 1988.

The Dodgers acquired 2018 American League Most Valuable Player Mookie Betts in a trade with the Boston Red Sox before the start of spring training. He joined a roster that included career Dodger All-Stars Clayton Kershaw, Walker Buehler, Kenley Jansen, Cody Bellinger, Joc Pederson and Corey Seager, as well as players who developed into All-Stars after joining the team in Max Muncy and Justin Turner.

The Dodgers leaned on an entirely homegrown starting rotation — including Kershaw, Buehler, Julio Urías, Tony Gonsolin and Dustin May — on the way to the seventh championship in franchise history.

Buehler and catcher Will Smith were first-round selections under Friedman. Free-agent acquisition AJ Pollock hit 16 home runs and slugged .566 in his second season as a Dodger.