Raw sewage discharged from manhole on Eden Isle in St. Petersburg

The city has been under a consent order with the state since 2017 to clean up the city’s sewage mess.
Partially treated sewage contamination prompted warning signs at St. Petersburg’s North Short Park in September 2016. On Monday, state environmental officials reported a raw sewage leak not far away in the 1200 Block of Eden Isle Blvd. NE. [Times (2016)]
Partially treated sewage contamination prompted warning signs at St. Petersburg’s North Short Park in September 2016. On Monday, state environmental officials reported a raw sewage leak not far away in the 1200 Block of Eden Isle Blvd. NE. [Times (2016)]
Published July 8
Updated July 9

Times Staff Writer

ST. PETERSBURG — About 1,500 gallons of raw sewage bubbled up from a manhole on Eden Isle Monday, according to Florida's Department of Environmental Protection.

It flowed into a stormwater catch basin located at the 1200 Block of Eden Isle Blvd NE. A department crew arrived around 7 a.m. and managed to clear enough of the blockage to allow the flow of sewage to continue, but they are still working to clear it fully. Water samples are being taken and warning signs are posted in the neighborhood.

The location is in the northeast part of St. Petersburg, north of Snell Isle, near St. Raphael Catholic Church.

According to a department incident report, replacing the gravity line at the site should eliminate future issues.

St. Petersburg experienced a sewage crisis in 2015 and 2016 when up to a billion gallons of partially-treated wastewater was released into the city’s waterways and streets.

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The state found in 2016 the city had discharged more than half of all sewage spilled in Florida and the next year imposed a consent order which required St. Petersburg to spend $326 million to fix leaky pipes and sewage infrastructure.

In 2018, a string of wastewater discharges in the city violated the order and St. Petersburg was slapped with a $25,000 fine.

Contact Kavitha Surana at KSurana@tampabay.com. Follow @Ksurana6.

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