Advertisement
  1. Things to Do

IIFA notes: No live broadcast of Bollywood film awards

A giant stage is under construction at Raymond James Stadium for the International Indian Film Academy awards.
A giant stage is under construction at Raymond James Stadium for the International Indian Film Academy awards.
Published Apr. 21, 2014

TAMPA — Without tickets to Saturday's International Indian Film Academy awards show, chances are slim of witnessing the extravaganza staged at Raymond James Stadium.

Unlike, say, the Super Bowl, there is no live television broadcast of the IIFA awards.

Instead, the program will be video recorded for televising in June on Star Plus, an Indian cable channel available locally to Verizon Fios and Dish TV subscribers for an additional fee.

IIFA claims the show will eventually reach an estimated 800 million viewers in 110 countries. Some markets are remote, many without systems of measuring viewership, so those numbers will be difficult to confirm.

On Verizon Fios, Star India is Ch. 1751, part of a four-channel South Asian Hindi package available for $34.99 per month. Dish TV offers Star Plus on Ch. 696, part of a two-channel Indian television package costing $24.99 per month.

Two of the Tampa Bay area's most popular cable providers, Time Warner and Direct TV, don't include Star Plus in their channel lineups.

The alternative is patience, until someone uploads the pageantry on YouTube, where portions of previous IIFA ceremonies can be viewed.

Just don't confuse IIFA footage with the similarly glamorous Filmfare, Zee Cine, Big Star, Screen, National and Star Guild award show clips. India's film industry apparently enjoys congratulating itself as much as Hollywood does.

John Travolta expected Saturday

IIFA plans to put out a statement today, but actor John Travolta is expected to walk the green carpet before attending Saturday night's Bollywood film awards at Raymond James Stadium.

An IIFA tradition, the green carpet is where fans without tickets throng to see stars arriving for events. Saturday, it's expected to go from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. IIFA announced plans for Travolta's appearance on Twitter Saturday.

A forecast fit for the movies

IIFA took a bit of a gamble by moving its awards show outside to RayJay. And January, February and March have been wetter than normal, with almost 10 inches of rain (nearly 2 inches more than the three-month average).

But the week's forecast could hardly be better: lows in the 60s, highs in the high 70s and low 80s, no rain forecast, plus lots of sunshine through Wednesday, and partly cloudy skies thereafter.

"The weather looks really nice this week," Bay News 9 meteorologist Josh Linker said Sunday. "It's just going to be warm and dry — typical April weather."

Times staff writer Richard Danielson contributed to this report.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Draped against the St. Petersburg skyline on Tuesday evening on January 14, 2020, the Bella Vita is visible as it docks in Port St. Pete. The yacht is nearly 250 feet long and costs about $650,000 to charter for a week in the winter, according to broker Moran Yacht and Ship. It can accommodate 12 passengers between its six staterooms and six decks, and a staff of 22. [MARTHA ASENCIO RHINE  |  Times]
    Meet the Bella Vita, a yacht almost too luxurious to believe.
  2. An Australian shepherd named Waylon gets some pampering from Kathryn Ross-Nash at the Florida Gulf Coast Classic Cluster of Dog Shows held Jan. 9-13 and Jan. 15-19 at Florida Classic Park in Brooksville.  Ross-Nash of Bradenton is an owner/breeder/handler of Australian shepherds and has been showing dogs for 30 years. "I love the show. Love the set-up, and I'm close to home," she said. [MICHELE MILLER  |  Times]
    Annual Florida Gulf Coast Cluster Dog Show draws thousands of dogs to Brooksville from around the country. The winners go on to the Westminster show in New York next month.
  3. Ava Calvin, 5, participates in a unity dance during the First Night of Kwanzaa in St. Petersburg ceremony on Thursday evening. [BOYZELL HOSEY  |  Tampa Bay Times]
    In St. Petersburg, community gathers for annual tradition.
  4. Clearwater may soon vote to allow commercial megacycles to ply the streets downtown and on Clearwater Beach. They'll be missing a key ingrediant, though: Beer and wine. [Pedal Pub]
    One operator calls the proposed ordinance a deal killer without beer and wine. The city council on Thursday will discuss a six-month pilot program.
  5. As with last year’s Christmas program at Northcliffe Baptist Church, the special event this year will include music, narration and skits. [Northcliffe Baptist Church]
  6. Alligator Attraction started offering sloth yoga classes in November. [kissagator.com]
    Sloth yoga and other sloth activities are becoming more popular around the Tampa Bay area, but some say it puts the animals in peril.
  7. Charlie explains to his parents and sister, Beth, that the best thing about church is that there are no Herdmans there. Pictured, from left: Sarah Krug as Mother (Grace Bradley), Amber Marino as Beth, Frank Miller as Father (Bob Bradley) and Jude Mys as Charlie. [Kristina Mitten]
    Live Oak Theatre presents ‘Best Christmas Pageant Ever'
  8. Classic Reflections Carriages is offering carriage rides starting at 6 p.m. Dec. 19-21 throughout downtown Brooksville. Reservations are made in person on each event date, starting at 4 p.m., in front of the historic courthouse. [Brooksville Main Street]
    Holiday events in Pasco and Hernando counties
  9. Glenn Woods, 62, shapes a decorative bottle made with a blend of porcelain clays at Pottery Boys Clay Studios on Nov. 18  in Palm Harbor. Woods and his partner, Keith Herbrand, 56, have created dozens of pieces, including holiday decorations, vases, coffee cups, bowls and platters for the Tour de Clay, a progressive tour of five pottery studios in the Tampa Bay area featuring the work of 33 artists from near and far. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD  |  TImes]
    The annual effort supports working artists and benefits charity.
  10. Ari Shipley, 5, (left) reads to a golden retriever named Turbo, while her brother, Jett, 3, looks on. Reading to Turbo is a new program at the Spring Hill/Harold G. Zopp Memorial Library. [MICHELE MILLER  |  Times]
    Specially trained therapy dogs help youngsters grow their reading skills.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement