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  1. Visual Arts

Art that's sensitive to the environment

Red snails at HCC Ybor Art Gallery, Ybor City.
Published Jan. 28, 2014

Snails in nature don't get around much but the big red ones you see here have covered a lot of ground. After stops including Art Basel Miami Beach and New York's Central Park, they have a temporary rest stop through Earth Day, April 22, outside the art gallery at Hillsborough Community College's Ybor campus at Palm Avenue and 15th Street in Tampa. The recycled plastic mollusks are the work of the European-based Cracking Art Group and William Sweetlove, a collective that uses recyclable plastic for environmental visual statements. Inside the art gallery, see more environmentally sensitive art in "The Water's Edge," a multimedia installation by László Horváth that chronicles a year spent kayaking and hiking along the Hillsborough River. It opens Feb. 6 with a reception from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. that includes a gallery talk at 6:15. For gallery hours, call (813) 253-7674. Free.

Image from HCC Ybor art gallery

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