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Florida in Focus: Climate Change

A network of newsrooms across the state, including the Tampa Bay Times, have banded together to track the impacts of climate change.

  1. These marine mammals were named "right whales" because they were considered by whalers to be "the right ones to hunt." [NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION]
  2. Sea rise is pushing inland and amplifying the threats from hurricanes, wiping out one of the rarest forests on the planet in the Florida Keys. [MATIAS J. OCNER  |  mocner@miamiherald.com]
  3. Flooding from an October king tide in Miami Shores fills streets, sidewalks and driveways at its peak. [Miami Herald]
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  5. Daryle Prager, 81, stands at the highest point this year’s King Tides reached in her waterfront yard in Surfside. She said she doesn’t have much time before the water reaches her home, so she’s forced to sell the house. [ALEX HARRIS  |  Miami Herald]
  6. Motorists head north of Key Largo on U.S. 1, in anticipation of Hurricane Irma on Sept. 6, 2017.  Keys officials announced a mandatory evacuation Wednesday for visitors, with residents being told to leave the next day. [Associated Press]
  7. This is a king tide at the Key Largo Kampground & Marina in Key Largo. (Photo by Nancy Snyder) [NANCY SNYDER  |  Photo by Nancy Snyder]
  8. Water from heavy rain floods a driveway in August on Snell Isle Boulevard NE in St. Petersburg.  ALLIE GOULDING   |   Times [ALLIE GOULDING  |  Tampa Bay Times]
  9. Oil Sands mining operations at the Syncrude Canada Oil Sands project near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on June 13, 2017. (Photo by Larry MacDougal, © Imago via ZUMA Press) [IMAGO  |  ZUMAPRESS.com]
  10. Researchers from the University of Central Florida and International innovation company, Imec have developed a camera that uses specific wavelength of light to easily find pythons in habitat where they are typically well camouflaged. 
 [Imec]
  11. Golfers practice at the Miami Beach Golf Club at 2301 Alton Road, on Sept.18. [PEDRO PORTAL  |  Miami Herald]
  12. Waves crash in front of an American flag that is planted on a jetty during a high surf from the Atlantic Ocean, in advance of the potential arrival of Hurricane Dorian, in Vero Beach on Sept. 2. [GERALD HERBERT  |  AP]
  13. Members of the fire rescue team Task Force 8, from Gainesville help remove a body one week after Hurricane Dorian hit The Mudd neighborhood in the Marsh Harbor area of Abaco Island, Bahamas, on Monday. [GONZALO GAUDENZI  |  AP]
  14. Destruction caused by Hurricane Dorian is seen from the air, at Abaco Beach Resort in Marsh Harbor, Abaco Island, Bahamas, on Sept. 7. The Bahamian health ministry said helicopters and boats are on the way to help people in affected areas, though officials warned of delays because of severe flooding and limited access. [GONZALO GAUDENZI  |  AP]
  15. This GOES-16, GeoColor satellite image taken Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at 17:10 UTC and provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Dorian moving off the east coast of Florida in the Atlantic Ocean. (NOAA via AP) [AP]
  16. A cyclist and vehicles negotiate heavily flooded streets as rain falls, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in Miami Beach, Fla. Certain neighborhoods regularly experience flooding during heavy rains and extreme high tides.  New storm water pumps are currently being installed along the bay front in Miami Beach. National and regional climate change risk assessments have used the flooding to illustrate the Miami area's vulnerability to rising sea levels. [AP Photo | Lynne Sladky] [LYNNE SLADKY  |  AP]
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