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  1. Visual Arts

What's happening in Tampa Bay art: 3 exhibits open at Tempus Projects, artists explore desolation

A detail of one of Jay Giroux’s pieces that explores desolation in “Non Place,” on display starting Thursday at Gallery 221 in Tampa. [Gallery 221]
A detail of one of Jay Giroux’s pieces that explores desolation in “Non Place,” on display starting Thursday at Gallery 221 in Tampa. [Gallery 221]
Published May 16, 2019

CONTEMPORARIES: Tempus Projects, Cunsthaus

Tampa's Tempus Projects and Cunsthaus, the women's collective that formed there, have showcased thoughtful exhibitions from emerging local and international artists. They're both opening new exhibitions this weekend, on display through June 29.

At Tempus, it's "Dark and Full of Flowers: Secundo Sunistra," a juried exhibition that asks artists to interpret Florida's dark side contrasted against its beauty. It's a followup to last summer's "Sunistra," which explored the same concept, so the state's sinister side must run deep. It was juried by Joanna Robotham, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Tampa Museum of Art. Among the works in the exhibit is Catalina Cheng's Femme Fatale, 2018.

Cunsthaus presents "Guchi," an exhibition of works by Johanna Keefe. Through the creation of a brand, GUCHI, Keefe explores how vessels and object acquisition from the 17th century through today depict European brutality and dominance.

Also opening is "Anatomy of a Mesh," a group exhibition exploring the irregularities of digital representation, on display through June 15. Free. 7-9 p.m. Saturday. 4634 N Florida Ave. tempus-projects.com.

NOWHERE: "Non Place"

Think urban landscape, and you see recognizable buildings and famous street corners. But artists Robert Aiosa and Jay Giroux like to focus on forgettable parts of urban landscapes, which they do in an exhibition on display at Hillsborough Community College's Gallery 221 and Gallery 3@HCC. "Non Place" is inspired by the hallmarks of desolation: torn fragments of advertising, vacant buildings in states of decay and the absence of human life. Both artists use sculpture, painting and installation to explore these overlooked areas, these "non places." Free. Opening reception from 5-8 p.m. Thursday, with a panel discussion with the artists at 6 p.m. 4001 W Tampa Bay Blvd., Tampa. hccfl.edu/gallery221.

CELEBRATE LOCALLY: Art Museum Day

Saturday is Art Museum Day and International Museum Day, and a few places in Tampa Bay are celebrating.

The Dalí Museum is offering $10 admission for Florida residents all day at the door only. 1 Dalí Blvd., St. Petersburg. (727) 823-3767. thedali.org.

The Imagine Museum offers free admission for everyone. 1901 Central Ave., St. Petersburg. (727) 300-1700. imaginemuseum.com.

Tampa Museum of Art offers pay-as-you-will admission, free tours, activities for children and families, 10 percent discounts at the Museum Store and Riverwalk Cafe and $10 off all membership levels. 120 W Gasparilla Plaza. (813) 274-8130. tampamuseum.org.

The Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg is offering 20 percent off new individual and dual memberships and 20 percent discounts for these new members in the MFA Store. 255 Beach Drive NE. (727) 896-2667. mfastpete.org.

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