Advertisement
  1. Local Weather

After chilly mornings, glorious weather ahead for Easter weekend

Keep a jacket handy if you’re headed out for early services Sunday, but you won’t need it for long. And leave the umbrella at home.
After a chilly start in the mornings, Easter weekend brings warm days and sunny skies, according to Spectrum Bay News 9. Temperatures return to normal next week, with no chance of rain through Thursday.
After a chilly start in the mornings, Easter weekend brings warm days and sunny skies, according to Spectrum Bay News 9. Temperatures return to normal next week, with no chance of rain through Thursday. [ baynews9.com ]
Published Apr. 2
Updated Apr. 2

The weather forecast for Easter weekend is, fittingly, glorious.

A cold front that moved through the area Thursday brought chilly temperatures and clear skies on Good Friday morning. More of the same is expected through Easter Sunday, said Diane Kacmarik, meteorologist for Spectrum Bay News 9.

The mercury dropped Friday morning to 50 degrees in Tampa — and into the low 40s in Pasco and Hernando — and will climb to near 70. Similar low temperatures are expected for Saturday morning, with highs in the mid-70s and clear skies.

Easter Sunday will start out cool, too, with lows in the mid-50s in Tampa.

Related: Passover, Easter to be a little more open in second year of the pandemic

“People doing outdoor services will want to be concerned with that,” Kacmarik said, but temperatures will rebound quickly, reaching the upper 70s on Sunday. “This time of year the sun warms things up after those chilly starts.”

Skies will be sunny through the weekend and into next week, when temperatures gradually warm. Highs will reach the upper 70s to low 80s through Thursday, normal for this time of year.

The next chance of rain doesn’t come until Friday next week when another front might move through. That’s not expected to affect temperatures much, though, Kacmarik said.

So could this week’s cold front be the last to bring such crisp temperatures? Maybe.

“We actually see fronts coming through into May, and they usually have less and less of an impact,” Kacmarik said.