Advertisement
  1. Local Weather

Atlantic storm system has 60 percent of forming tropical depression, forecasters say

A tropical wave near the west coast of Africa could become a named storm over the weekend.
The National Hurricane Center is continuing to monitor two tropical disturbances that could turn into cyclones over the next five days, according to the agency’s latest forecast.
The National Hurricane Center is continuing to monitor two tropical disturbances that could turn into cyclones over the next five days, according to the agency’s latest forecast. [ National Hurricane Center ]
Published Aug. 5
Updated Aug. 6

The National Hurricane Center is continuing to monitor two tropical disturbances that could turn into cyclones over the next five days, according to the agency’s latest forecast.

A tropical wave near the west coast of Africa has a 60 percent chance of forming in the next five days, with a 30 percent chance of forming into a tropical depression in the next 48 hours, the Hurricane Center said in its 2 p.m. advisory Friday.

Related: Hurricane season could produce a few more named storms than initially predicted

The wave and a broad low-pressure area are causing disorganized cloudiness and showers a few hundred miles south of the Cabo Verde Islands. Forecasters say the system could form a tropical depression late this weekend or early next week as it moves west to northwest across the tropical Atlantic.

A second disturbance in the central tropical Atlantic has a 20 percent chance of formation in the next five days. Environmental conditions could allow the system to develop slowly as it moves west to northwest toward the Lesser Antilles early next week.

The Atlantic has not had any tropical storms since Elsa in mid-July. The next two named storms will be called Fred and Grace.

2021 Tampa Bay Times hurricane guide

IT’S STORM SEASON: Get ready and stay informed at tampabay.com/hurricane

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE: Seven hurricane myths that need to go away

BACK-UP YOUR DATA: Protect your data, documents and photos

BUILD YOUR HURRICANE KIT: Gear up — and mask up — before the storm hits