Kathleen McGrory, Deputy Investigations Editor

Kathleen McGrory

Deputy Investigations Editor

I’m the deputy investigations editor at the Tampa Bay Times. I write and edit stories that shed light on wrongdoing. My work has exposed a previously unreported spike in the number of child gun injuries, traced the origins of a fatal power-plant accident and uncovered mistakes at a prestigious children’s hospital. I started my career at the Miami Herald, where I covered crime, schools, Miami City Hall and state government. (Sometimes, the four overlapped.) Before that, I studied at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. I live in St. Petersburg with my husband, who is also an editor at the paper, and our rescue beagle Susan.

Family settles for $2.3 million over All Children’s heart surgery death

Johns Hopkins All Children‘s Hospital. [CHRIS URSO   |   Times]
It is the first settlement to become public. Others are expected.

The law firm investigating All Children’s filed its report. The hospital will make big changes.

Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg. [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
The investigation was commissioned by the board of Johns Hopkins Medicine, which runs the hospital, following a Times investigation into fatal problems in All Children’s heart surgery unit.

Extra oversight for children’s heart surgery signed into law

Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg.  (SCOTT KEELER   |   Times)
Outside physicians will now be allowed to inspect Florida heart surgery programs. The change follows problems at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital.

In North Carolina, the New York Times reveals another heart surgery program in trouble

Screenshot of the New York Times investigation
Problems at Johns Hopkins All Children’s have brought the risks of children’s heart surgery — and the vastly different care some institutions provide — to the forefront in Tampa Bay.

Profit at Johns Hopkins hospitals tumbled. All Children's was to blame.

https://www.tampabay.com/storyimage/HI/20190528/ARTICLE/305289844/TS/1/TS-305289844.jpg
The decline was $31.7 million — 70 percent of the system's total — compared to the first quarter last year.